Cilantro Substitutes

Cilantro Substitutes

This article provides an overview of cilantro, what it tastes like, its availability, alternative names, and of course what other ingredients make cilantro substitutes.

What is Cilantro?

Cilantro is an annual edible herb that is cultivated for its fresh leaves and dried seeds, which are used as a spice. Cilantro belongs to the parsley family and is native to areas between southern Europe, northern Africa, and southwestern Asia.

Coriander is thought to have many health benefits, especially relating to the gastric tract.

What does Cilantro taste like?

Cilantro seeds have a lemony, floral flavor, while the root and leaves add a powerful, pungent flavor to dishes. Most people describe fresh cilantro as having a soapy taste, which is linked to a gene that detects specific aldehydes.

Is Cilantro readily available in Supermarkets?

Cilantro should be readily available in supermarkets and local fruit and veg outlets. The leaves are usually found in the fresh produce section, while the seed, is often found in the herbs and spices aisle.

What are some alternative names for Cilantro?

Cilantro is the common name in North America, while elsewhere it is commonly known as coriander, Chinese parsley, and dhania.

What is a good substitute for Cilantro in recipes?

Luckily, there are a number of great substitutes for cilantro. These include:

The best fresh cilantro substitutes include tarragon, basil, Thai basil, parsley, or dill. The best replacement for cilantro seeds would be cumin, garam masala, curry powder, or caraway.